Archive | Firefox Support

Can I Customize Firefox’s Toolbars?

Sick with that default way your icons look and you want to change things around a ‘bit? It is easy enough to do if you know where to look. Heck you could pretty much remove everything above your tab bar if you wanted to. The easiest way to customize your toolbar space would be to right-click on it and then click on the “Customize…” menu option.

From there everything is pretty easy to figure out. You can drag things into the box that pops up to remove them, and then click an drag things out of the box and into the menu to add them to the toolbar. On the bottom of that popup box you see a few other options as well.

The drop down box gives you the option to show just the icons, icons and text descriptions or just the text. If you don’t like the pretty icons, go hardcore and use the text only options. Personally I am an “icons only” kind of guy.

I don’t use the space and flexable space very much. They will help you push some of your icons around to the far left or far right if you need them to be there. The seperator will help you put little bars between your icons and toolbar spaces so things look nice and neat.

All the other icons you see there should be fairly familiar. If you have installed a few extensions, you might also see buttons for them there that you can drag over to your toolbar space.

Next thing you see if a check box option for using small icons. I have this one checked as well, because by doing so it shrinks my buttons down and gives me more toolbar space to work with. That’s more room for adding other neat buttons and options up there. It also helps to give you a little more viewing space where your Web sites are displayed too.

There is a button to add a new toolbar too. Use this if you need a new spot to expand all your buttons and options to. The last option you see here is for the folks that try to customize but end up messing things up and they don’t know how to go back.

Just hit the “Restore Default” button and everything will go back to the way it looked when you first installed Firefox (well, toolbar and icon positions anyways).

What Are Firefox Themes?

Themes in Firefox are little files you can download and install that change the look and feel of the browser. You can think of it as changing the external skin that you see when you use Firefox from day to day. This is just one more useful way to personalize Firefox and make it your own.

The easiest way to download new themes is to open up Firefox, then go to Tools then click on Add-ons. When that Window pops up, click on the “Themes” tab and then click on the “Get Themes” link on the bottom. This will load up Mozilla’s official Firefox themes Web site. If you don’t want to go through all of that to visit it – just bookmark this link:

https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/browse/type:2

Now you are ready to give Firefox a new look. Search around and find a theme that you like and click on the install link you find on the Web page. After that, you should get pop up Window come up and ask you if you’d really like to install this new theme. Go ahead and continue from there – then once it is finished it will ask you to restart Firefox. Click away there too – it is ok to do.

Now to use your new theme, you’ll need to go to Tools then Add-ons then click on the Themes tab. If everything was done correctly you will find the theme you just picked as a selectable option now. Click on it, and then push the button that says “Use Theme”. Now the next time you restart Firefox the default theme will be gone and your new one should have taken it’s place. You can always go back by going through and to the same options again as well.

How can you download themes from other Web sites? This is a little more tricky – but try these steps.

  1. Download the theme file to your desktop
  2. Open up the Add-ons menu, and then click on the tab for themes
  3. Drag and drop the theme file into the theme selection box

If done correctly then you should see the new theme start to install. From here you can just follow along with the “continue” and “ok” buttons and should be good to go.

What Are Firefox Extensions?

Extensions in Firefox are exactly what you probably think they are. They extend the browser and add extra functionality that is not built in by default. There are thousands are extensions to choose from, but you don’t need to install every single one. Just pick up the ones you really need.

The easiest way to download new extensions is to open up Firefox, then go to Tools then click on Add-ons. When that Window pops up, click on the “Get Extensions” link on the bottom. This will load up Mozilla’s official Firefox extensions Web site. If you don’t want to go through all of that to visit it – just bookmark this link:

https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/browse/type:1

From there you can navigate yourself around and find some extensions that might interest you. For an example, lets say you want to use the Download Statusbar extension. All you need to do is click the “Install Now” button on that Web page for it.

After you do that, a new window should pop up asking you if you really wanted to install this. Wait for the countdown on the button to run out, and then click “Install Now”. After that you should see it downloading and when it is finished Firefox will ask you to restart the browser. Go ahead and do that, then when it returns your extension should be installed.

One more thing you might watch out for is that the extension works with the version of Firefox that you are using. Via the Mozilla Addon-ons Web site – they give you a version number of Firefox that the extension should be compatible with. If you have a problem getting it loaded, that might be the reason why.

You can download Firefox extensions from other Web sites as well. When you do, and you click on their install links you’ll get a warning message come up under your tab bar saying something to the effect of “this Web site is not authorized to do that”. If you are sure you want to install it, just hit OK and you should be good to go. Another nice thing about Firefox, it’s secure – but it keeps it simple.

What about plugins?

Plugins help your browser perform specific functions like viewing special graphic formats or playing multimedia files. Plugins are slightly different from extensions, which modify or add to existing functionality.

You can download plugins for Java, Windows Media, Quicktime, Flash and more from this Web site.

Why Should I Switch To Firefox?

This is the type of question you might ask yourself before moving over to what I would consider a better browser. Sure Opera, Internet Explorer and others might have their good sides and bad sides. I just feel like Firefox beats every other browser hands down.

Don’t just listen to me though, here are some other good resources and articles on why and how you can switch to Mozilla Firefox.

What is your favorite reason for switching?

How Do I Download Firefox?

firefoxlogo.jpgThe actual downloading of Firefox is as easy as downloading any other file or program from the Web. There is no secret method or open source handshake you must know. Just follow these steps and you should be alright.

First thing you need to go is point your browser towards GetFirefox.com. This will load up the offical Mozilla Web site for the Firefox browser. Once there, you should see a large icon saying “Download Firefox – Free”. Click on that. Once you click on that, the fun begins and Firefox should be on its way.

Once the download is finished, find where you saved the install file to. The file should be called “Firefox Setup” then with a version number following that. Once you have located this file, double click it to install (this is for the Windows folks).

The install process is pretty easy to understand. Read each screen and hit next when you are done. The default installation should be fine for the general user. When your done you will find a new browser and a new world opened up to you that is just waiting for you to explore.

Just as a word of warning, be careful when downloading Firefox from other Web sites. I know there are tons of Web sites that try to say “Buy Firefox for $14.95!” or something to that effect. Firefox is free, you should never have to pay for it.

What is Mozilla Firefox?

Firefox?

I want to tackle some of the more basic questions people have about Firefox. What could be more basic a question than “What is Firefox?”. It like Opera and Internet Explorer is a Web browser. It allows you to view Web sites on the thing we call the Internet or World Wide Web. Here is the definition of Firefox from Wikipedia:

Mozilla Firefox is a graphical web browser developed by the Mozilla Corporation and a large community of external contributors. Firefox, officially abbreviated as Fx or fx and popularly abbreviated FF, started as a fork of the Navigator browser component of the Mozilla Application Suite. Firefox has replaced the Mozilla Suite as the flagship product of the Mozilla project, under the direction of the Mozilla Foundation.

Mozilla Firefox is a cross-platform browser, providing support for various versions of Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux. However, the source code has been unofficially ported to other operating systems, including FreeBSD, OS/2, Solaris, SkyOS, BeOS and more recently, Windows XP Professional x64 Edition.

Firefox’s source code is freely available under the terms of the Mozilla tri-license as free and open source software.

You can also check out more about Firefox’s history and future on Wikipedia as well. Have any more basic Firefox questions to ask?

Get More Toolbar Space in Firefox

FirefoxI think I have a pretty optimized Firefox setup. Personally I don’t think anybody needs more than two toolbars in Firefox at all times. How can you cut down on the clutter and keep everything accessible with just a few clicks here and there?

1. Shrink Your Main Menu Bar!

Install the Tiny Menu extension to shrink your main menu navigation. This extension replace the standard menu bar with a tiny menu popup.

2. Toss Out the Firefox Throbber!

Ditch the throbber in the upper right hand corner. Each tab has a built in throbber to let you know when a Web page is loading, this main one is not needed anymore. Get rid of it and give yourself some more space.

3. Use Small Icons to Save Space!

Use small icons on your toolbars. To do that, you can right click on the navigation toolbar and click “Customize”. At the bottom of that popup you should see a check mark box for “Use Small Icons”. While you are there you can drag away or add any items you think you might need or never use at all. Personally, I have back, forward, refresh, stop, home, and downloads there.

Any other suggestions for a more organized and clutter free toolbar?

Use Internet Explorer and Firefox

If there any reason why you can not use more than one browser? No. A lot of folks get caught up in being “uber fans” though and don’t realize that all browsers have some good points and some bad points. This article I found yesterday really got me to thinking – it might have the same effect on you as well.

Naturally, all of this has generated a bit of contention among users of Microsoft Windows where Firefox fans put down IE and users of IE 7 say they don’t want to bother with changing anything on their computers that is working. I’m an unlikely Solomon, but I do know what I would order if I were in charge: Use them both.

+ Continue Reading Firefox or Internet Explorer? Why Not Both?

Extensions 101

I got an E-mail the other day from a guy who wanted to know if I knew of a starting spot for people to visit if they were interested in making extensions for Firefox. I had to do some hunting around – but then I found this link via Mozilla’s own Web site:

Extensions are small add-ons that add new functionality to Mozilla applications such as Firefox and Thunderbird. They can add anything from a toolbar button to a completely new feature. They allow the application to be customized to fit the personal needs of each user if they need additional features, while keeping the applications small to download.

There is a lot of good information here to be had. Check it out for yourself, and if you have any more resources please leave a comment and let us all know about them.

Where is my Firefox Profile Folder?

This is a question we get time and time again, so I thought I would post the full listing for where your profile folder is for Mozilla Firefox based on your operating system of choice…

Windows 95 (without Desktop Update)
C:WindowsMozilla

Windows 95 (with Desktop Update)/98/Me
C:WindowsApplication DataMozilla

C:WindowsProfiles<Windows login/user name>Application DataMozilla

Windows NT 4.x
C:WinntProfiles<Windows login/user name>Application DataMozilla

Windows 2000 and XP
C:Documents and Settings<Windows login/user name>Application DataMozilla

Windows Vista
C:Users<Windows login/user name>AppDataRoamingMozilla

Unix
~/.mozilla/

Mac OS X
~/Library/Mozilla/

~/Library/Application Support/

Looking for an easier way to access your profile folder?  You can do so right from the menu bar, if you know where to look for it.  Make sure you check out this tutorial for an even easier way to find your profile folder:

Find Your Firefox Profile Folder, The Easy Way!

Hope that helps you locate your Firefox profile folder.  If there is a location I missed, be sure to let me know and I will get it added.