Tag Archives | mozilla

Anonymous Web Browsing With Torpark

Torpark is a browser based on Mozilla’s Firefox that promises to give folks anonymous Web browsing. Why is this something new? Well, it is the first anonymous browsing tool that doesn’t require you make a dozen changes to your browser or jump through anymore hoops past installing to work.

Torpark uses the Tor network of internet routers set up by the Electronic Frontier Foundation that already has tens of thousands of regular users.

Whenever any computer connects to the net it freely shares information about the address it is using. This is so any data it requests is sent back to the right place.

The Tor network tries to stop this information being shared in two ways. First, it encrypts traffic between a computer and the Tor network of routers – this makes it much harder to spy on the traffic and pinpoint who is doing what.

Related Reading:
+ Official Torpark Web Site
+ BBC News – Free anonymising browser debuts
+ Boing Boing – Torpark is out

Mozilla Patches Firefox

Have you updated your version of Firefox yet?

Mozilla Corp. Thursday updated its Firefox browser to fix 7 flaws, including 4 pegged by the open-source developer as “Critical.” Of the four critical vulnerabilities patched in Firefox 1.5.0.7, none are currently being exploited, Mozilla said in detailed descriptions of each fixed flaw. In fact, Mozilla said in several of the descriptions that it was not sure whether the specific vulnerabilities could be exploited, but had issued patches just in case.

+ Read More About the Security Threat!

Book Of Mozilla Easter Egg

Easter eggs hidden away inside of programs is nothing new. What I didn’t know till this morning was that even Firefox has a few tricks up it’s sleeves.

It was a lot of fun to read but one thing that really struck me as interesting was this about:mozilla “Easter Egg” that they mention. The Book of Mozilla has been something that even the first version of Netscape has had in it. You can pull it up in Firefox/Netscape by typing in about:mozilla into the Address Bar and pressing Enter.

+ Read More About the Book of Mozilla Easter Egg!

Bill Gates on Firefox

In an article I mostly skimmed over because it was mostly filled with Microsoft pats on the back, I did run across an intresting nugget of information.

Bill Gates is one of the people with Firefox on his computer, so I asked him for his opinion.

“I played around with it a bit, but it’s just another browser, and IE [Microsoft’s Internet Explorer] is better,” Mr Gates told me, and challenged my assertion that Firefox’s ‘market share’ is growing rapidly.

“So much software gets downloaded all the time, but do people actually use it?” he argued.

Yes, Mr. Gates people do actually use it.

Firefox Gains, IE Loses

This is some good news for anybody who is a fan of Firefox.

Mozilla’s Firefox gained half a percentage point in market share at the expense of Microsoft’s Internet Explorer during August, continuing the steady climb of the open-source browser, a Web metrics firm said.

Firefox now owns 11.8 percent of the global browser market share, said Net Applications, a jump of .5 percent from July’s 11.3 percent. Internet Explorer, meanwhile, now accounts for 83 percent of browsers used to surf the Web; that’s down from July’s 83.5 percent.

[Read More About Firefox’s Gains!]

Gmail Manager

Everybody loves Gmail, but some of us love it too much. Do you ever find youself switching between Gamil logins just to get all your E-mail checked? Moving the mouse around, logging in, logging out – it is all a lot of work. Why do all that work though, when there is an extension that will do all of that for you? Gmail Manager has come to your rescue!

[Learn More About Gmail Manager!]

Firefox 101

Want to know a quick version of Firefox’s history? Asa Dotzler has posted one in response to some comments that have been coming towards the browser’s focus.

Firefox was born when a small handful of open source developers decided, without any financial support, and as a completely volunteer project, to build a Web browser that could attract millions of regular user and give them a better Web experience.

There was not only no financial support for the Firefox project (then called m/b for the directory in CVS where the new browser lived) there was no formal Mozilla community or project support and definitely no support from the large companies contributing to the development of the old Mozilla suite of applications.

+ Read More About Firefox’s History and Background!