Tag Archives | organize

Add Another Bookmarks Toolbar to Firefox

Have more than a few bookmarks you want to keep handy on the bookmarks toolbar in Firefox but don’t have the room?  Multirow Bookmarks Toolbar, an extension for Firefox, will help you solve that issue by letting you add as many bookmark toolbars as you need.

Multiple Bookmark Toolbars in Firefox

Once installed, the options here are simple.  You can enable or disable the multiple bookmark rows, and you can also set the max number rows to display.  If it doesn’t exactly match up with your current theme or you want to tweak it some, check out this post from the mozillazine.org forums

If you need more bookmark room in the browser, this add-on will do the trick.  You can pick it up on the Firefox Add-ons site.

Learn to Manage Your Search Engines in Firefox

I got an e-mail from a reader of Firefox Facts, and they wanted to know  how can you re-organize your search engines in Firefox’s search box that lives in most people upper-right hand corner of Firefox.

This can easily be done via the built in search engine manager.

Manage Your Search Engines in Firefox

Click on Firefox’s search box, as if you were going to change search engines, and look at the bottom for a menu selection titled, “Manage Search Engines”.  Clicking it will bring up the Manage Search Engine List.  From here you can:

  • Edit Search Engine Keywords
  • Move Search Engines Up or Down
  • Remove a Search Engine
  • Restore the Default Search Engines
  • Get More Search Engines
  • Enable/Disable the “Show Search Suggestions”

There you have it.  Now Firefox has not always had this option.  Back in previous versions, you had to do some heavy duty hunting and pecking to really edit and organize your search engine selections.  This at least gives you a more user friendly interface, and I am all about the user friendly around here.

How Have You Customized Firefox?

Give me your Firefox screenshots!

One of the best things about Firefox is that we can customize it to no end, and thus far – no other browser on the market has been able to stack up with that fact.  So I am curious, how have you customized Firefox to fit your needs?  How have you organized your toolbars and icons?

I’ll start things off by showing you my current browser setup:

mitch-firefox

As you can see I like to keep it pretty simple, and I am rocking the Chromiefox theme right now.  Send me your Firefox screenshots (to mitch@mitchkeeler.com), or post a link here in the comments to them.  If anything else, we might pick up a few customization tips from one another.  I’ll save the best for a round up for a later date and time.

CHECK OUT THE GALLERY!

Tagmarks – Better Tagging Through Icons

Tagmarks Want to make tagging your bookmarks as easy as clicking an icon?  Tagmarks, the add-on for Firefox, hopes to do just that.  The idea here is to bring one-click bookmarking in Firefox together with the tagging power of the browser.

With Tagmarks, you have a lot of different icons that popup whenever you hover over the traditional bookmarking star you see in the Firefox 3 address bar.  When you click in each icon, it will add the page to the bookmarks and associate that icon with that page, through the use of tags.

Selecting one icon has the same effect as clicking on the bookmarking star. It will add the page to the bookmark.   The perk here is that it will also apply a tag to the page and always remember and show that icon when you are at that page.  Think of it as a visual tool for you too, to say for example, “oh that is a search magnifying glass, this must be a search site”.

mouseover

Watch the Screencast of Tagmarks in Action!

You can pickup Tagmarks on the Firefox Add-ons site.  It is still sandboxed, so if you need a login to download it, check out this list of user names and passwords you can use.  Also check out the author of the add-on’s web site for more information on how to get the most out of Tagmarks.

Add Flags to Firefox Tabs

firefox-flag-tab We have colored them, moved them, shrunk them – so why not add little colored flags to your tabs?  The FlagTab add-on for Firefox gives a little more control when it comes to organizing your open tabs in Firefox.  For each tab open you can add a different colored flag, or give several the same colored flag.  The organizational options here are endless.

This extension for Firefox would come particularly handy when it comes to working on a project, where you need to keep track of which tabs are with which set of sites.  For example, if I was writing something about Firefox, I might flag the Mozilla sites I was getting information from green and the non-Mozilla sites red.  That way I can quickly see the difference between the two.

So if you are in need of another way to organize your open tabs – FlagTab might just do the job.

Bookmarks by Chore or Subject?

Sort your bookmarks by task and not by subject. Over time I have learned to depend less and less on my bookmarks for getting me around the Web. Instead of searching through my bookmarks for the link I was wanting to browse again – I’ll just type it into the Google search box in Firefox if it was that hard to remember.

Most of the time, I can just type it into the address bar faster or get there another way (such as RSS subscriptions via Google Reader).

The few times I do use bookmarks, it is to check through a series of links for a task and not a subject. For an example, I have a social network folder in my bookmarks bar. There I have all my MySpace, Facebook, Flickr, Hulu and other social-like sites. In another, I have my “site stuff” folder which has my Google AdSense, Google Analytics, FeedBurner and other links relating back to my various web projects.

So is my habit weird or do you find yourself doing the same?

StatusBars Cures Your S.O.L.-ness

Multiple Status Bars for FirefoxToo many icons down there in your statusbar?

Let me just tell you – your not alone. Firefox fans usually call this deadly addition S.O.L. otherwise known as statusbar over load. There is a cure. The solution to your problem, is to install one more Firefox extension named StatusBars.

I promise you, there will be no side effects and you will be able to continue to use Firefox without the shame of your peers. This extension gives you the ability to switch between multiple status bars with different content. You can then customize your statusbars icon, name and arrange the icons the way you want.

You can set up your statusbars so you have one for the site you are on (greasemonkey, adblock, rip, etc), one for general information (forcastfox, gmail notifier, stock ticker, etc) and one for webdesign (tidy, web developer, firebug, etc).

You too can once again have a status bar in Firefox that is neat, tidy and organized.  Don’t kick the habit – feed the need!

Organizing Your Firefox Bookmarks

It seems like every time I see somebody’s browser, they have their links organized in a new way. Some people don’t even bother removing the default bookmark links that came with the browser. Others don’t use bookmarks at all. How do you roll? I figured I’d go over some of the techniques that are out there.

Basic Old School Organization

This one is probably the most widely use way of doing things. Keep all your bookmarks in folders, and keep those folders in your main bookmarks folder. Organize them by topic and then you can always find what your looking for – even though you have to go down a few levels to find it.

Favicon Pretty Picture Organization

I did this one for a while, and I liked it till I needed more bookmarks than my Bookmarks Toolbar could handle. Here you remove the titles and navigate from web site to web site by only using the favicon to go by. It does make things less cluttered – but hard to work with if you have too many links. An easy way of getting it done without much fuss would be to use the Smart Bookmarks Bar extension.

Everything in my Face Organization

Last but not least, you have the technique I am using right now – having almost all your bookmark folders sitting inside the Bookmarks Toolbar. Here I have drop down menus of each category and it doesn’t usually take more than two clicks to get anywhere. For less important bookmarks I still need to visit once in a blue moon – I’ll still put them in the bookmarks section outside of my toolbar links folder. Might sound busy, but it does work.

So, with those three new ways of organizing your bookmarks – is it time for you to clean house?

Google Calendar in Your Sidebar

I like to use Google Calendar much less as a time organizer and more as a big to do list. Now I hadn’t really given two thoughts to the mobile version because I don’t really browse the Web on too many mobile devices. After having a look though – I thought to myself – this would make the perfect sidebar for Firefox.

Google Calendar in Your Sidebar

This is how you can get it added to your own browser:

1. Browse to http://calendar.google.com/m

2. Bookmark that web page, or drag the link to your links toolbar.

3. Right-click on the bookmark, select “properties” and then click the checkmark for “load this bookmark in sidebar”.

I don’t know about you but this just makes the application a little more usable for me. Big fonts, big colors and a guide of what I need to do over the next few days. Also it acts as a great reminder tool for folks who like to make sure they are getting things done.

Organize Your Downloads in Firefox

I like to download all of my stuff that I find via the Web into a folder in My Documents called “Downloads”. It is an easy way for me to keep track of stuff I have downloaded so I can save it for later if I need to do so.

How can you tell Firefox to save all of your downloads in one specific spot? First thing you need to do is go into Tools, and then select Options. A new window should pop up with your browser options. In that first tab, go down to the middle of the box where it says “Downloads” and then make your way down to the browse button next to the Window for “Save files to…”.

Download Options

Browse to the folder that you wish to save all of your downloads to, save and then exit. Now Firefox knows your default download location. This is really handy when you wonder what that program was you downloaded last week – or if you misplace an important file from the Web, you can keep a backup of it here.