Tag Archives | profile

Join Me on Google+

Want to follow me on Google+?  I usually post all my content from Firefox Facts and my other various projects on there.  You can find me on Google+ here:

https://plus.google.com/+MitchKeeler1/

Would love to see your comments and feedback there as well.  The whole Google+ thing is pretty new to me but I hope to get into it more with a little more interaction going on between myself and the readers of this blog.  I hope you enjoy!

Rapportive

Rapportive ReviewWant to add information rich profiles to Gmail? Then you need the Rapportive add-on for Firefox.  This great add-on will allow you to see what people look like, where they are based, a few of their interests and social network profiles on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and more.

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Find Your Firefox Profile Folder!

Navigate to your Firefox Profile Folder

Every so often, you might need to find your Firefox profile folder to do some tweaking or maintenance of your own.  In the past, this has lead to diving through your operating system’s folders and after twenty clicks, finding the information you need.  Since Firefox 3.6 there is a much easier way to open your profile folder, with no additional extensions installed.

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Firefox Profile Files – What Do They Do?

Firefox Profile FilesWhen browsing through your Firefox profile folder, you might see a lot of odd files. Some might make sense, such as your searchplugins folder, however others might seem a little odd.

Here are some of the important files you might seen in your profile folder and what they are used for.

  • search.sqlite and the searchplugins folder – The first file, search.sqlite stores the order that your search engines (for the search box) are sorted. Inside of the searchplugins folder you can find all the extra search engines you have installed.
  • mimeTypes.rdf – your preferences with respect to what Firefox does when it comes across known file types.
  • formhistory.sqlite - this is where information that you have searched for or entered into forms on web sites (think autocomplete) is stored.
  • places.sqlite – this is the file that contains your bookmarks and previously visited web sites.
  • cert8.db – all your security certificate settings and any SSL certificates you have imported are stored here.
  • permissions.sqlite – the file here stores site specific preferences, such as if you allow it to install add-ons, show images, display popups or any special orders you have allowed for that domain.
  • key3.db and signons3.txt – these are the files that store your password information you have saved.
  • persdict.dat – this file will hold your words you have personally put into Firefox’s built in spellchecker.
  • cookies.sqlite – your web site cookies are stored here.

Now, I do know there are more files – however, these are the files that are most important for you to know about, just in case something bad might happen.  Hopefully, this additional documentation will come in handy when troubleshooting your own Firefox issues or problems.

More Command Line Firefox Tips

After yesterday’s post about launching tabs from the run box I thought I would share with you some other command line Firefox tips worth getting familiar with.

Open the Firefox profile manager: firefox -p

Start Firefox with a specific profile: firefox -p “user name”

Open a Specific URL: firefox -url http://www.firefoxfacts.com

Open a URL in a New Window: firefox -new-window http://www.firefoxfacts.com

Open a URL in a New Tab: firefox http://www.firefoxfacts.com

Search Your Default Search Box Search Engine: firefox -search yourtermhere

For more that you can try I would suggest checking out the command line article over at MozillaZine.org or at Mozilla.org. Some still work, and some might not – but these are the best of the ones I found. If you have any suggestions for alternatives you know feel free to drop in a comment here and let us all know about your favorite.

Check out the other posts in this series:

Easy Editing of Config Files

Edit Your Config FilesAre you one of those people that likes to tweak around with what is behind the pretty Firefox curtain? If you want to jerk back the interface and get to the guts of the browser, you might need to jump here or jump there to get to the settings you need.

One person made this job a little easier with the Edit Config Files extension for Firefox. Once installed it gives you quick and easy access to such things as the about:config screen and your UserChrome.css file as well. Here is a full list of the options from the extension.

UserChrome.css, UserContent.css, prefs.js, user.js, Open Profile Folder, and about:config. Quick and easy access to all the tweakers’ tools. Now I wouldn’t suggest messing around with these unless you know what your doing – but if you do this extensions can be a real time saver because you no longer have to go on a hunt for how to open each of these options up.

Where is my Firefox Profile Folder?

This is a question we get time and time again, so I thought I would post the full listing for where your profile folder is for Mozilla Firefox based on your operating system of choice…

Windows 95 (without Desktop Update)
C:WindowsMozilla

Windows 95 (with Desktop Update)/98/Me
C:WindowsApplication DataMozilla

C:WindowsProfiles<Windows login/user name>Application DataMozilla

Windows NT 4.x
C:WinntProfiles<Windows login/user name>Application DataMozilla

Windows 2000 and XP
C:Documents and Settings<Windows login/user name>Application DataMozilla

Windows Vista
C:Users<Windows login/user name>AppDataRoamingMozilla

Unix
~/.mozilla/

Mac OS X
~/Library/Mozilla/

~/Library/Application Support/

Looking for an easier way to access your profile folder?  You can do so right from the menu bar, if you know where to look for it.  Make sure you check out this tutorial for an even easier way to find your profile folder:

Find Your Firefox Profile Folder, The Easy Way!

Hope that helps you locate your Firefox profile folder.  If there is a location I missed, be sure to let me know and I will get it added.

Cutting Down the Browsing Clutter

Sure you have heard of trimming the tree around Christmas time, but what about trimming your browser? The folks over at CyberNet have done it again, producing one heck of a nice guide to cutting the slack from your Firefox experience.

Firefox is a truly amazing browser and I think my favorite part about it is that the extensions make it remarkably useful. They add features that I wouldn’t expect a Web browser to do, such as serve as an FTP client. While I think extensions are great, I also find myself installing some that I just don’t need. It is almost like an addiction, and with a new year right around the corner I thought it was a good time to trim some of the “fat” (a.k.a. extensions) off of my Firefox profile by re-evaluating my need for the extensions.

They cover just about everything. From cleaning up your toolbar to clearing the mess from your profile, you have no excuse not to do a little house cleaning before the new year rolls around.