Tag Archives | research

Firefox 4 Ready Add-ons and Themes

Find Compatible Themes and Add-ons

With Firefox 4 being right around the corner, are all of your favorite add-ons and themes going to make the cut?  In my own opinion, I think that the drastic changes in both the backend of Firefox and the visual frontend will lead to a lot broken add-ons and favorite themes.  Hopefully though, this will not be the case once Firefox 4 is ready for the general public at large.

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Give Firefox a Highlighter

There have been several highlighter extensions I have seen over the years for Firefox, however this one might be my favorite.  The ultra light-weight Highlights add-on for Firefox simply highlights selected text on web pages with a right-click of the mouse.

Highlighter for Firefox

To highlight text on a web page, select the text, right-click (‘Ctrl+Click’, on Mac OS X) and select ‘Highlight’ menu from the popup.  The default yellow highlight color can easily be changed, by clicking the “Highlights” icon on the status bar, and choosing the color picker.  To remove the highlights, simply refresh the page.

No matter if you are doing research or you just like to highlight interesting points while you read, the Highlights extension is an excellent way to mark your spot on the Web.

Headup Delivers You Related Content in Firefox

headup - giving you inline searches without leaving the page your browsing The idea of having a Firefox extension that gives you content related to what you are looking at is nothing new really, however I have found a Firefox add-on that will help you get it done in a new and exciting way. 

Headup underlines words on pages when you browser.  When you hover over those words, you get relevant content from popular web services. 

Headup - find more information as you browse Online

Technically speaking, they  “presents you with textual and rich media content related to the objects and terms it identifies on the pages you browse.”  Here are a few more examples from their web site:

Use Headup’s ability to recognize objects and relationships to discover all kinds of information quickly and effortlessly. Here are some examples:

  • Discover which of your friends like a particular band and gain access to the band’s videos and lyrics.
  • Find blog posts and stock news about a company and discover which of your contacts work there.
  • Get alerted about your friends’ birthdays and see which books they’re likely to enjoy as a gift.

Overall, I have to say it is an interesting idea – and a cool tool.  Sometimes these semantic plugins kind of confuse the general public, so I would really recommend playing with Headup to see if it is right for you.  You can pickup the Headup add-on on Headup.com or the Mozilla Add-ons web site.

Reframe It in Firefox

Want to be able to comment on any web site out there on the Web, without the permission of the web site in question?  Reframe It opens up a new portal of communication, by allowing you to communicate through specific comments next to the web site you are referencing. 

Why just send a simple text-based note, when you can send that and the web site you are talking about all in one swift, easy to access movement?  Here is the extension in action:

Reframe It Screenshot

It also supports sharing via Facebook, Twitter, RSS, HTML, and direct email so you can quickly share your comments.

Reframe It allows you to simple say what you want to where you want to.  This extension would be perfect (as an example) if you were working on a web site re-design, and wanted to show your boss the areas you wanted to work on.  Another example, would be citing research, when working on an article.

You can learn more about Reframe It via the Reframeit.com web site and pick up the Firefox add-on for the service on the Firefox Add-ons site.

WebMynd for Google

WebMynd What is WebMynd?  It is all about personalizing your search – with colors.  Ok, now before you think this is some new age hippy thing, hear me out.  This add-on for Firefox will help find and keep track of information from a number of different sources.

What sources does it support?  We have:  YouTube, Wikipedia, Flickr, Twitter, Amazon, Economist, CNN, LinkedIn, TechCrunch, Hacker News, Digg, Reddit, Google Books, Fluther, Delicious, Yahoo! Shopping, Scribd, Backtype, and Youlicit.

The easiest way to explain WebMynd is that it makes Google better by personalizing it with information and resources that you value.

Here is a little more about how it works from the developers:

After installing the WebMynd plug-in just search and browse the web as you would regularly.

When you search on Google, WebMynd will add results from your own browsing history and the top sites that you visit. And you can configure it to search many of your favourite sources such as Twitter, Wikipedia and Flickr amongst many others. If you use Twitter, you can ask your Twitter network for help while searching, right from Google.

When you are using WebMynd to record your history, a copy of the sites you visit is kept on your computer’s hard drive and the text is sent to our servers so we can index the information to make it easier for you to retrieve later. You can turn WebMynd on and off with a single click and you can set it to never record particular sites, you have 100% control.

Here it is in action:

WebMynd currently supports Firefox 3 on Windows, Mac and Linux.  You can pick up the Firefox extension via the Firefox Add-ons site or WebMynd.com.

ScrapBook – Save Your Web Page Collections

1 It seems like I am always doing research on one thing or another, for a future article or a future project of mine.  There are not that many tools out there to help you collect your information and save it for later.  The ScrapBook extension for Firefox is one of the few.  It is simple and also allows to save web pages and organize them as you see fit.

Here are some of the features ScrapBook provides…

  • Save Web page
  • Save snippet of Web page
  • Save Web site
  • Organize the collection in the same way as Bookmarks
  • Full text search and quick filtering search of the collection
  • Editing of the collected Web page
  • Text/HTML edit feature resembling Opera’s Notes

If you find yourself in the need of a better note taker, then you might want to pick up the ScrapBook add-on for Firefox.

IE6 is an Ugly Unbeatable Stepsister?

Joe Wilcox over at eWeek has put together a pretty interesting graph charting the adoption rate for the web browsers out there in 2007.  The graph and story along with it are both pulling information from the recent Forrester Research report, “Enterprise Desktop and Web 2.0/SAAS Platform Trends, 2007.”

Web Browser Adoption in 2007

As you can see Internet Explorer is still pulling head as you would assume it would do, but Firefox still is holding a healthy share of the market.  Internet Explorer 7 itself still can’t beat the ugly stepsister that is Internet Explorer 6 though.