Tag Archives | Security

Panic Button

Panic Button for FirefoxAfraid somebody is peeking at your browsing habits behind you?  Don’t have time to shut down Firefox the right way? The Panic Button extension for Firefox provides the quickest way to hide all the browser buttons in a stroke of the mouse.

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Visualizing Your Reused Passwords

Password Reuse VisualizerTime and time again, people have suggested that you use multiple passwords for multiple websites.  Using the same password over and over again might eventually lead you to trouble – should one of the many accounts you have across the Web ever be compromised. The Password Reuse Visualizer is, if nothing else, a great reminder of this.

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Do Not Track Button Coming to Firefox

Cookie TrackingBy early next year, Mozilla promises that cloaking your internet activity will become much easier.  Technology that supports something like a "Do Not Track" button will be delivered soon.  So what is this all about and doesn’t Firefox already keep people from tracking you?

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Find Bugs and Earn Cash from Mozilla

Bug Hunting for MozillaLooking for a way to make some extra cash? Mozilla has expanded their bounty program for finding flaws in Mozilla-based products (like Firefox and Thunderbird) to their websites and web applications too.  You can earn anywhere between $500 to $3,000 for bugs you find that are high severity or critical vulnerabilities.

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Website Password Troubleshooting in Firefox

Firefox remember password

Firefox should remember passwords by default.  If you have turned off or disabled this feature though, it might not.  Every so often, I need to use the Firefox password manager to remember a password, and it seems that for the life of me I can not get it to do it.  What might be the problem? Check your exceptions!

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Turn Off Session Restore

Disable Session Restore in Firefox

Due to privacy concerns, some Firefox users may wish to disable or turn off the session restore feature in Firefox. As an example, if your computer is used by multiple users, the browser could crash while you are checking your Gmail account.  Rather than restoring Firefox, you decide to go do something else.  When somebody else comes in to launch Firefox, the browser will be restored to your inbox (due to fact that is where it crashed).  If you want a little more browsing privacy, here is how you disable the session restore feature in the browser.

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How to Check for Updated Plugins

Plugin Check Help for Firefox

After yesterday’s news about the fake Firefox update that is out there in the wild, I thought it might be a good time to go over how you can get your plugins updated.  Thankfully, Mozilla has made this really simple with the Plugin Check part of their website.

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Dell Releases Locked-Down Firefox

Dell's Secure Firefox

It looks as if Dell is going into the browser business, with its virtualized version of Firefox.  The idea here is to provide the users a virtual instance of the browser, so that malware and other bad things can’t reach your main system files. This in turn would reduce your overall exposure to drive-by malware attacks from websites that might host malicious code.

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Microsoft to Share Firefox Facts?

So that you end your week with something really amusing, I had to share this story I found at CyberNet as it concerns Microsoft’s new browser comparison or “fact” sheet.

Microsoft Facts about IE8

So we are to believe that Firefox and Chrome are both insecure, difficult to use, and unreliable?  The Internet Explorer team might want to check their calendars, because last time I checked – it is June 26th, not April 1st

If that isn’t enough – they also have a MythBusting page.  What is your favorite “fact” they are claiming?

Multi-Process Support Coming to Firefox?

Some have discovered a new project from the Mozilla Wiki documenting the first steps and timeline for Firefox to become a multi-process supporting browser.  The project in question, simply known as Content Processes looks to separate processes to display the browser UI and web content.

Here are the current initial goals:

  • Provide better application UI responsiveness
  • Improve stability from slow rendering or crashes caused by content
  • Improve performance, especially on multi-core machines

Now why do this, and what does it even mean?  Well, both Google Chrome and Internet Explorer 8 have moved in this direction for increased stability.  For an example, with multi-process support, a single tab crash wouldn’t take down your entire Firefox browsing experience.  It would only effect that one tab, because it would be seen as its own process. 

It might be a year or more before we see this in action via our own Firefox installations, however it is nice to see that Firefox is always looking to expand and check into other areas of stabilization to see if we can all benefit from it.